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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 152 Table of Contents     

To study the effect of 'Isabgol' on absorption of 'Aspirin'


Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi, Pakistan

Date of Web Publication2-Aug-2010

Correspondence Address:
Afshan Siddiq
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi
Pakistan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-7406.66997

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How to cite this article:
Shahid M, Siddiq A, Mazhar H, Baig SG. To study the effect of 'Isabgol' on absorption of 'Aspirin'. J Pharm Bioall Sci 2010;2:152

How to cite this URL:
Shahid M, Siddiq A, Mazhar H, Baig SG. To study the effect of 'Isabgol' on absorption of 'Aspirin'. J Pharm Bioall Sci [serial online] 2010 [cited 2020 Feb 22];2:152. Available from: http://www.jpbsonline.org/text.asp?2010/2/2/152/66997

Sir,

The objective of this study is to elucidate the absorption of a drug (Aspirin) with the concurrent administration of isabgol. The theory behind this is that isabgol has the property of adsorption, and when given along with a drug decreases its absorption by the Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT) into the blood. Absorption is the phenomena by which food or drug material crosses the GIT wall into the blood circulation and the absorption occurs via finger-like projections, that is, microvilli in the small intestine. If these absorption sites are occluded, as in the case of isabgol, absorption in the small intestine will be affected. The absorption of a drug is affected by a number of factors that influence the availability of the drug in the blood (bioavailability), and one of them is the presence of food in the GIT. Isabgol is a hydrophilic bulk forming agent, which swells if it comes in contact with water. If a drug is taken along with Isabgol its effect may be delayed, as gastric emptying time will increase because of Isabgol (a bulk forming agent), or its effect may be reduced, as Isabgol decreases the absorption of the drug because of the adsorption phenomena. In such a case, the site of absorption of the drug in the GIT is important, that is, whether it will be absorbed via the stomach or intestine, into the blood. While in case of aspirin, the main site of absorption is the small intestine.

Isabgol husk is obtained from genus Plantago (Psyllium plant) and is commercially produced from P. ovata and P. psyllium in Europe, Pakistan, and India. Isabgol husk use has increased, as it is used as an ingredient in high-fiber breakfast cereals that help in reducing blood cholesterol levels. Isabgol husk contains a high-fiber content, which is water soluble and differs from other types of fibers, for example, wheat bran and cellulose that are insoluble in water. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition the use of soluble fiber diet is effective in mild-to-moderate hypercholesterolemia. [1] Isabgol also forms a thin layer on the intestinal wall that prevents the absorption of cholesterol into the systemic circulation.

In view of the excellent adsorption property of isabgol (psyllium's husk), the present study has been designed to explore its effect on the absorption of a drug from the GIT. The study was conducted on mice, with approval taken from the Departmental Animal Ethics Committee prior to commencement of the study. Nine mice were divided into three groups (three mice in each group). After marking the animals, they were left for 15 - 20 minutes in a tray where Isabgol was kept for them to feed on. After that each group of mice was given aspirin orally in doses of 75, 90, and 105 mg/kg, respectively. Besides these three mice groups, one group of mice was taken as the control, which was given aspirin in a dose of 75 mg/kg without prior treatment with isabgol. 'Tail Flick Latency Time' of each group was taken at 15, 30, and 45 minutes. The observations are recorded in [Table 1].

Control group was given aspirin (75 mg/Kg p.o. only).

Group 1 was given Isabgol orally followed by Aspirin (75 mg/Kg p.o.)

Group 2 was given Isabgol orally followed by Aspirin (90 mg/Kg p.o.

Group 3 was given Isabgol orally followed by Aspirin (105 mg/Kg p.o.)

From the observation chart, [Table 1], we have found reduced tail flick latency time in all three groups of mice with reference to the control. In group 1, at 15 minutes, the mean tail flick latency time value was found to be significantly higher ( P < 0.05) as compared to the control group, which may be because the aspirin was not fully adsorbed on the isabgol.

By applying student t-test, the results were found to be significant ( P < 0.05), which suggests that isabgol affects the absorption of aspirin when administered concomitantly. The decrease in the absorption of aspirin by isabgol's concurrent administration may be due to the adsorption and formation of a mucilage film of isabgol on the intestinal wall. This proposed mechanism also suggests that isabgol can be beneficial in reducing the absorption of fats in the small intestine and may help in reducing the blood cholesterol levels. [2],[3] It also suggests that isabgol can be used as a carrier in sustained release dosage forms. [4]

This investigation is only a pilot study performed on nine mice. Further studies are needed on a larger group of animals to corroborate the above hypotheses.

 
   References Top

1.Bell LP, Hectorn KJ, Reynolds H, Hunninghake DB. Cholesterol-lowering effects of soluble-fiber cereals as part of a prudent diet for patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52:1020-6.  Back to cited text no. 1  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
2.Abraham ZD, Mehta T. Three-week psyllium husk supplementation: effect on plasma cholesterol concentrations, fecal steroid excretion, and carbohydrate absorption in men. Am J Clin Nutr 1988;47:67-74.  Back to cited text no. 2  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
3.Bell LP, Hectorn KJ, Reynolds H, Hunninghake DB. Cholesterol-lowering effects of soluble-fiber cereals as part of a prudent diet for patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52:1020-6.  Back to cited text no. 3  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
4.Mohan MG, Himasankar K, Naryan C PS, Murthy Ramana KV. Controlled release of Diclofenac Sodium by gum karaya-chitosan complex coacervate: in vivo evsluation. Indian J Pharm Sci 2001;63:408.  Back to cited text no. 4      



 
 
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