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SYMPOSIUM IOMC 2011
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 324-328

Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics


Department of Community Medicine, MM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Mullana, India

Correspondence Address:
Rambha Pathak
Department of Community Medicine, MM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Mullana
India
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Source of Support: Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-7406.84431

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Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS) is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3%) had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came out to be .311. This correlation was found to be statistically significant ( P = .007). Sixty-five percent of the case had IDRS higher than 60. Conclusions : Glycaemic control in diabetics can be better assessed with glycosylated hemoglobin and FPG together. A positive correlation between FPG and HbA1c allows for the use of HbA1c along with FPG in diagnosing type 2 DM but the two should not be used interchangeably. IDRS can be used as a screening tool for diabetes.


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