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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 623-630

Biofriendly substitutes for xylene in deparaffinization


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research, Tiruchengode, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Prosthodontics and Oral Implantology, KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research, Tiruchengode, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research, Tiruchengode, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Viswanathan Prema
Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research, KSR Kalvi Nagar, Tiruchengode, Tamil Nadu.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_164_20

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Background: Xylene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is routinely used in histopathological laboratories. It is biohazardous and produces many toxic effects like carcinogenesis. A safer substitute for xylene is necessary to minimize its usage. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 1.7% dishwashing solution, 95% lemon water, and 100% coconut oil when compared to xylene as a deparaffinizing agent during hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Materials and Methods: Fifteen paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were selected. Four sections were made from each block. One section was stained with conventional H&E method using xylene (group A) as deparaffinizing agent and other three sections were stained with xylene-free H&E method using 1.7% dishwashing solution (group B), 95% lemon water (group C), and 100% coconut oil (group D), respectively. Slides were scored blindly by a single pathologist considering the parameters such as nuclear and cytoplasmic staining; uniformity, clarity, and crispness of staining; and presence or absence of wax retention. Results: Adequate nuclear staining was noted in 100% of sections of groups A, B, C, and D (P < 0.001), whereas adequate cytoplasmic staining was noted in 93.33% each in groups A, C, and D when compared with 100% in group B (P > 0.05). Uniform staining was present in 80% of groups A and B and in 73.33% of groups C and D (P > 0.05). Clarity of staining was present in 86.66% of groups A and B and in 80% of groups C and D (P > 0.05), whereas crispness of staining was seen in 73.33% of groups A and D, 86.66% of group B, and 80% of group C (P > 0.05). Wax retention was noted in 20% of groups A and B, and 26.66% of groups C and D (P > 0.05). Adequate staining for diagnosis was noted in 100% of group A sections followed by 93.33% in group B, 86.66% in group C, and 80% in group D as compared with 90% in group B (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Dishwashing solution, lemon water, and coconut oil can be used as safer and cost-effective substitutes to xylene for deparaffinization in H&E staining procedure.


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