Journal of Pharmacy And Bioallied Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2011  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 525--530

Resistant patterns of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections at a university hospital in Delhi


MS Alam1, PK Pillai2, Prem Kapur3, KK Pillai1 
1 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Majeedia Hospital, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India
3 Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research and Hakeem Abdul Hameed Centenary Hospital, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
M S Alam
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Hamdard University, New Delhi
India

Background : The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bloodstream infections is often empirical and based on the knowledge of local antimicrobial activity profiles of the most common bacteria causing such infections. Aims : The present study was aimed to investigate frequency of bacterial pathogens causing septicemia and their antimicrobial resistant pattern in hospital admitted patients. Settings and Design : It was a prospective study, conducted at Majeedia Hospital, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India. Material and Methods : We examined prospectively, 168 bacterial strains isolated from 186 clinically diagnosed septicemia cases admitted at a University Hospital in New Delhi, over a period of six months from July 2009 to December 2009. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, USA) guidelines. Results : The most frequently identified Gram-positive bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci 63.5%, Staphylococcus aureus 23.1%, enterococci 5.8% and alpha-haemolytic streptococci 5.8%. The most frequently Gram-negative bacteria identified were Acinetobacter species 31%, Salmonella typhi 24.1%, Escherichia coli 23.3% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 13.8%. Coagulase-negative staphylococci showed maximum resistance to cefaclor 57.1% and ampicillin 46.9%. Staphylococcus aureus showed maximum resistance to amoxicillin 100% and ampicillin 91.7%. Acinetobacter species showed maximum resistance to amoxicillin 89.7%, amoxiclav 87.1% and ampicillin 85.7%. Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed maximum resistance to ampicillin, 46.4%, 92%, 93.8% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions : Gram-negative pathogens predominated in bloodstream infections. Resistance to most of the antimicrobial agents for a number of pathogens implicated in bloodstream infections, especially in Gram-negative bacteria, has reached worrisome levels and continues to increase.


How to cite this article:
Alam M S, Pillai P K, Kapur P, Pillai K K. Resistant patterns of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections at a university hospital in Delhi.J Pharm Bioall Sci 2011;3:525-530


How to cite this URL:
Alam M S, Pillai P K, Kapur P, Pillai K K. Resistant patterns of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections at a university hospital in Delhi. J Pharm Bioall Sci [serial online] 2011 [cited 2020 Sep 23 ];3:525-530
Available from: http://www.jpbsonline.org/article.asp?issn=0975-7406;year=2011;volume=3;issue=4;spage=525;epage=530;aulast=Alam;type=0