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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1338-1340  

Assessment of perceived competency of interns toward dental practice


1 Department of Prosthodontics, Dental College and Hospital, Azamgarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
3 Department of Periodontology, Dental Institute, RIMS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
4 Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontics, Mithila Minority Dental College and Hospital, Darbhanga, Bihar, India
5 Senior Lecturer, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Microbiology, Indian Army Government of India, Raiganj, Uttar Dinajpur, West Bengal, India
6 Professor HOD, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, KIMS Dental College and Hospital, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Date of Submission08-Mar-2021
Date of Decision16-Mar-2021
Date of Acceptance22-Mar-2021
Date of Web Publication10-Nov-2021

Correspondence Address:
Ravi Shankar Yadav
Department of Prosthodontics, Dental College and Hospital, Itaura, Azamgarh, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpbs.jpbs_147_21

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   Abstract 


Background: Many academic institutions have been cheering lecturers to execute flipped learning methodologies. The present study determined perceived competency of dental interns toward dental practice among various dental colleges. Materials and Methods: A total of 138 interns of dental college were provided with self-administered questionnaire with close-ended questions. All were instructed to read it and submit it. Results: Out of 138 subjects, there were 78 males and 60 females. The mean value for general patient management was 3.12 and 3.0 in males and females, periodontology and dental public health was 2.54 and 2.65, conservative dentistry was 2.70 and 2.82, oral rehabilitation was 2.32 and 2.30, orthodontics was 2.10 and 2.28, management of children and special needs patients was 2.52 and 2.64, oral and maxillofacial surgery was 2.49 and 2.42, and drug and emergency management was 2.62 and 2.60, respectively. Conclusion: Dental interns were well prepared toward dental practice.

Keywords: Dental colleges, dental interns, special needs patients


How to cite this article:
Yadav RS, Sharma R, Singh N, Meeta, Singh CK, Ganti S. Assessment of perceived competency of interns toward dental practice. J Pharm Bioall Sci 2021;13, Suppl S2:1338-40

How to cite this URL:
Yadav RS, Sharma R, Singh N, Meeta, Singh CK, Ganti S. Assessment of perceived competency of interns toward dental practice. J Pharm Bioall Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Aug 16];13, Suppl S2:1338-40. Available from: https://www.jpbsonline.org/text.asp?2021/13/6/1338/329982




   Introduction Top


Most of the dental colleges and hospitals in India are government or the private colleges being controlled by trusts or societies. With the limitation in emergence of new government dental colleges, the number of private dental colleges has increased drastically providing better facilities to students as compared to old government one.

The poor infrastructure, outdated technologies, machines, dental chairs, and limited number of teaching and nonteaching faculty are the leading causes for opening of new dental colleges. There is low supply of funds to government to these colleges. The number of private dental colleges is almost 3–4 times than government dental colleges.[1]

Many academic institutions have been cheering lecturers to execute flipped learning methodologies. The goal is that students will carry out preclass groundwork, come to the class prepared and ready to engage with the lecturer, and then consolidate their knowledge through after class revision.[2]

Preparation involves accessing information posted electronically, including reading selected chapters from ebooks, or PDF notes; watching PowerPoint slide shows, videos, and links to YouTube presentations; or visiting recommended internet study sites. During lecture time, students have opportunities to ask questions rather than sitting through a traditional formal lecture.[3] Thereafter, they will be given online revision exercises, assignments, and assessments to complete in order to merge their new knowledge and provide the lecturers with a form of continuous evaluation.

Lectures are taken online or offline and the trends of providing written notes have been eliminated. Online lecture materials are available which prove to be fruitful for students. Soft copies of textbooks are available which is the biggest advantage nowadays.[4] Considering advent of new technologies, dental colleges need to be updated. Increase in globalization necessitates the need to acquire full knowledge regarding new concepts and technologies to provide best facilities to future dental surgeons of India.[5] The present study determined perceived competency of dental interns toward dental practice among various dental colleges.


   Materials and Methods Top


A total of 138 dental interns of dental colleges were recruited to participate in the study. They were enrolled after getting their written consent.

Demographic profile of each dental intern was recorded. A pretested, validated, self-administered questionnaire containing close-ended questions was used. Questionnaire was based on the management of patients in clinical departments, general dental public health, periodontium and gingival health, vitality of dental teeth and restorations, oral rehabilitation of patients, management for orthodontically maligned and impacted teeth, care and treatment for children requiring special needs, care for geriatric patients, management of traumatic teeth and facial bone injuries, and emergency treatment to accident cases. All were given this questionnaire and the response was recorded. Results thus obtained were analyzed statistically, with the level of significance set at 0.05.


   Results Top


[Table 1] shows that out of 138 subjects, there were 78 males and 60 females.
Table 1: Subjects distribution

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[Table 2] and [Graph 1] show that the mean value for general patient management was 3.12 and 3.0 in males and females, periodontology and dental public health was 2.54 and 2.65, conservative dentistry was 2.70 and 2.82, oral rehabilitation was 2.32 and 2.30, orthodontics was 2.10 and 2.28, management of children and special needs patients was 2.52 and 2.64, oral and maxillofacial surgery was 2.49 and 2.42, and drug and emergency management was 2.62 and 2.60, respectively. A nonsignificant (P > 0.05) difference was observed in parameters between both genders.
Table 2: Self-perceived competency of interns

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   Discussion Top


Since the increase in internet usage, it has converted to be essential source for communication as it is easy to access all kinds of information quickly and directly.[6] It allows information to be used for entertainment, leisure, social, educational, and research purposes. The presumption is that all students possess the requisite technological skills and competencies and are comfortable using and interacting on the various internet platforms.[7] Unfortunately, this strategy requires an increased amount of self-regulated learning, which may result in a cognitive overload and a breakdown in the learning process due to reduced support from a lecturer.[8]

The paucity of distribution of dentists based on population created origin of new dental diseases as one of the general peoples' health problem.[9] According to recent estimates, dental caries are usually seen among school-going children being above 50%. Similarly, it is observed that periodontal diseases are prevalent in approximately 90% of children. The consumption of tobacco and tobacco products in both chewable and nonchewable form proved to be major cause of increased number of oral cancer cases in young adults. Government as well as private sectors organizes health awareness-related programs time to time in order to create knowledge among general population related to their general and dental health. The Indian Medical Association and the Indian Dental Association are two major bodies which govern these programs.[10] However, still, the disease burden is high; to bring down the disease burden, we need to assess the competency of the young dental graduates toward their preparedness for dental practice.

We found that out of 138 subjects, there were 78 males and 60 females. Prabhu et al.[11] found that 71.5% (143/200) showed overall response rate. 83.9% of the subjects found to be prepared well regarding dental practice. It was further observed that most of the subjects considered endodontics and preventive dentistry as “bread and butter.” At the same time, few dental interns found to be inadequately prepared related to dentistry. 60%–65% answered that they are not prepared regarding removal of impacted third molars. Also they were inadequate to handle complications such as root fracture, sinus perforations and dry sockets, management of trauma to dentofacial complex, replacement of missing teeth with conventional bridges and implants, and in performing periodontal surgical procedures.

We observed that the mean value for general patient management was 3.12 and 3.0 in males and females, periodontology and dental public health was 2.54 and 2.65, conservative dentistry was 2.70 and 2.82, oral rehabilitation was 2.32 and 2.30, orthodontics was 2.10 and 2.28, management of children and special needs patients was 2.52 and 2.64, oral and maxillofacial surgery was 2.49 and 2.42, and drug and emergency management was 2.62 and 2.60, respectively.

Sykes et al.[12] in their original research study on dental students of various years observed that 85%–90% of students were capable of using and accessing internet sites for completing their projects, assignments, and study. PowerPoint presentations with adding various animations or videos are not difficult for them. Research further showed that 70%–85% of dental students were capable for using these internet sites individually without requiring anybody's help. They were competent to complete assignments, use of Google Forms, downloading and uploading videos, completion of online quizzes, learning and reading, etc. Most of the students required internets on daily or weekly basis to complete and submitting their works on time. Few students encountered difficulty in doing work online, and hence, there was need to educate and train these students to make them competent in handling online issues more confidently.

The shortcoming of the study is small sample size.


   Conclusion Top


Authors found that interns were well prepared toward dental practice.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Marchese TJ. Contexts for competency Based curricula in dental education. J Dent Educ 1994;58:339-41.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chambers DW. Competencies: A new view of becoming a dentist. J Dent Educ 1994;58:342-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rafeek RN, Marchan SM, Naidu RS, Carrotte PV. Perceived competency at graduation among dental alumni of the University of the West Indies. J Dent Educ 2004;68:81-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Clark JD, Robertson LJ, Harden RM. British dental journal 2003;195:125-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Arena G, Kruger E, Holley D, Millar S, Tennant M. Western Australian dental graduates' perception of preparedness to practice: A five-year follow-up. J Dent Educ 2007;71:1217-22.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Seldin LW. Informed consent. The patient's rights. Dent Today 2003;22:86-8.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
McGrath C, Cobert EF. Do dental graduates of the University of Hong Kong (19972001) perceive themselves prepared for dental practice? Hong Kong Dent J 2005;2:84-91.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Gift HC, Hoerman KC. Attitude of dentists and physicians towards the use of dietary fluoride supplements. ASDC J Dent Child 1985;52:265-8.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Greenwood LF, Lewis DW, Burgess RC. How competent do our graduates feel? J Dent Educ 1998;62:307-13.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Corbet EF. Future directions in periodontology. Hong Kong Dent Assoc Yearb 1989;34-6.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Prabhu S, John J, Saravanan S. Perceived competency towards dental practice among interns of various dental colleges in India. J Educ Ethics Dent 2012;2:33-9.  Back to cited text no. 11
  [Full text]  
12.
Sykes LM, Postma TC, Uys A, Brandt P, Crafford E. Dental students' self-perceived competency and usage of the internet for learning and evaluation purposes-Part 2. S Afr Dent J 2015;75:377-81.  Back to cited text no. 12
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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