Journal of Pharmacy And Bioallied Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 203--206

Comparative evaluation of marginal bone loss and implant failure rate in smokers and nonsmokers


Abhishek Kumar1, Saba Nasreen2, Subhash Bandgar3, Devleena Bhowmick4, Ritesh Vatsa5, Priyanka Priyadarshni6 
1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Buddha Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Patna, Bihar, India
2 Department of Dentistry, SKMCH, Muzaffarpur, Bihar, India
3 Department of Prosthodontics, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Oral Medicine and Radilogy, PDM Dental College and Research Institute, Bahadurgarh, Harayana, India
5 Department of Dentistry, Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital, Muzaffarpur, Bihar, India
6 Department of Prosthodontics, Patna Dental College and Hospital, Patna, India

Correspondence Address:
Ritesh Vatsa
Department of Dentistry, Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital, Muzaffarpur, Bihar
India

Background: Smoking impose various ill-effects on the alveolar bone concerning dental implants including reduced bone height, delayed healing of bone, poor peri-implant bone formation, increased bone loss, and peri-implantitis. Aims: The present clinical trial was aimed to analyze the smoking effect on dental implant survival rate as well as marginal bone loss in dental implants. Materials and Methods: Out of 86 patients, Group I had 43 patients who were smokers and Group II had nonsmokers. Following the implant placement, marginal bone loss radiographically and mobility were assessed clinically at 3, 6, and 12 months after implant loading. Results: The mean marginal loss seen in smokers at 3 months was 2.13 ± 0.21, 2.46 ± 0.09, 2.60 ± 0.0.92, and 2.74 ± 0.11 for maxillary anterior, maxillary posterior, mandibular anterior, and mandibular posterior regions, respectively. The 12-month recall visit showed a higher proportion of smokers having implant mobility. In smokers, 13.95% (n = 6) of the study participants had implant mobility, whereas 6.97% (n = 3) of the nonsmokers had mobility. Conclusion: Smoking is associated with long-term implant failure which is directly proportional to the duration ad frequency of smoking. Furthermore, smoking has a detrimental effect on dental implants and its surrounding bone.


How to cite this article:
Kumar A, Nasreen S, Bandgar S, Bhowmick D, Vatsa R, Priyadarshni P. Comparative evaluation of marginal bone loss and implant failure rate in smokers and nonsmokers.J Pharm Bioall Sci 2021;13:203-206


How to cite this URL:
Kumar A, Nasreen S, Bandgar S, Bhowmick D, Vatsa R, Priyadarshni P. Comparative evaluation of marginal bone loss and implant failure rate in smokers and nonsmokers. J Pharm Bioall Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jul 3 ];13:203-206
Available from: https://www.jpbsonline.org/article.asp?issn=0975-7406;year=2021;volume=13;issue=5;spage=203;epage=206;aulast=Kumar;type=0